Charles J. Sullivan is an Assistant Professor of Political Science & International Relations in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Nazarbayev University.  Dr. Sullivan earned his PhD in Political Science from The George Washington University (2014) in Washington, DC. Prior to joining Nazarbayev University, he worked as an instructor at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.
Dr. Sullivan is a comparativist and specializes in the politics of the countries of the former Soviet Union and Central Asia/Afghanistan. Dr. Sullivan’s research interests include Central Asian security issues, state failure and state building, energy politics, insurgency and war, Russian politics and foreign affairs, and U.S. foreign policy in Central Asia since independence.
Dr. Sullivan teaches courses on Comparative Politics, Central Asian Politics, Russian Politics, and Political Violence at Nazarbayev University.
 
Publications:
“State-Building in the Steppe: Challenges to Kazakhstan’s Modernizing Aspirations,” Strategic Analysis Vol. 41, No. 3 (2017), 273-284.
“State-Building: America’s Foreign Policy Challenge,” U.S. Army War College Quarterly - Parameters Vol. 46, No. 1 (Spring 2016): 51-65.
“Conceptualizing the Collapse: Stalin, Gorbachev, and the Downfall of the USSR,” East European Quarterly Vol. 43, No. 4 (December 2015): 243-264.
“Halk, Watan, Berdymukhammedov! Political Transition and Regime Continuity in Turkmenistan,” REGION: Regional Studies of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia, Vol. 5, No. 1 (2016): 35-51.
“Breaking Down the Man of Steel: Stalin in Russia Today,” Canadian Slavonic Papers/Revue canadienne des slavistes, Vol. 55, No. 3-4 (September/December 2013): 449-480.
“Pipeline Politics in the Post-Soviet Space: The View from Ashgabat,” Journal of Energy and Development, Vol. 34 (April/May 2008): 121-128.
Chapters:
“Civil Society in Chains: The Dynamics of Sociopolitical Relations in Turkmenistan,” in Civil Society and Politics in Central Asia, ed. Charles E. Ziegler (Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 2015), 249-275.
Working Papers and Chapters:
“Dealing  with  Despotism:  U.S.-Central  Asian  Relations  in  the  Post-9/11  Era,”  in  The Handbook of Central Asian Politics, ed. Reuel Hanks (Routledge).
Other Publications:

“Tranquility or Turbulence in Tashkent? Uzbekistan in the Post-Karimov Era,” OSCE Academy in Bishkek Central Asia Policy Brief No. 43 (November 2016).

“The Coming Fall of Kabul,” PONARS Eurasia Memo 386 (September 2015).

Charles J. Sullivan, ““Искусственные” праздники России (Russia’s Artificial Holidays),” Историческая разметка пространства и времени  (Издательство Волгоградского государственного университета, 2014).

“Breakdownistan: U.S. Concerns in Central Asia and Afghanistan Going Forward,” Small Wars Journal (July 2014).

Charles Sullivan and Ivan Kurilla, “Главное событие российско-американских отношений (The Main Event of Russian-American Relations),” Vedomosti (8 May 2013).